Where are Boohoo clothes made?

Are Boohoo clothes made in China?
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Where are Boohoo clothes made is one of the most important questions people ask when it comes to the fast-fashion clothing chain.

With dresses selling for as little as just £4 and the brand offering money off their products almost constantly, consumers are understandably demanding to know where the brand manufacture their clothes.

READ MORE: Is Boohoo ethical and sustainable?

While many fast-fashion chains produce their clothes in countries where cheap labour is available, 75%–80% of Boohoo’s clothing is produced in Leicester.

However that doesn’t necessarily mean Boohooo pay their workers any more than other fast-fashion brands.

The brand came under fire in 2020, after an investigation by The Sunday Times discovered that the company were underpaying their garment workers.

While the minimum wage for those over 25 is £8.72 in the UK, employees at the Leicester factory received an hourly wage of £3.50.

Workers’ rights group Labour Behind the Label, who worked with The Sunday Times to produce the report, found that staff were also being ‘forced to come into work while sick’ with the virus and there was no protection for those in the factory in terms of PPE and hand sanitiser. Unsurprisingly, this was later linked to an increase in cases in the city.

Boohoo Group plc owns a total of nine fashion brands including Miss Pap, Nasty Gal and Pretty Little Thing and was founded in 2006 by Mahmud Kamani and Carol Kane.

It’s grown hugely ever since, buying Oasis and Warehouse earlier this year and even eyeing up Arcadia’s doomed brand Topshop at the time of writing.

Pretty Little Thing offered their shoppers 99% off in November 2020 for their Black Friday sale, giving their fans the opportunity to fill their wardrobes with items at just 4p. This suggested that Boohoo group’s garment workers still weren’t being paid appropriately.

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