Is Rixo Ethical and Sustainable?

How does this fan-favourite brand fare?
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It’s safe to say that Rixo’s a crowd favourite — from editors to influencers to casual consumers. But is it ethical and sustainable?

The British mid-range designer brand founded by Henrietta Rix and Orlagh McCloskey is killing it with the vintage-inspired aesthetic. 

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The brand says it wants to ‘evoke a wanderlust and free spirit’ through its pieces. Its loyal clients will agree.

But beyond that, can the brand please its fans where its practices are concerned, particularly in terms of ethics and sustainability? 

Let’s dig a little deeper.

Is Rixo sustainable?

While Rixo doesn’t have a published sustainability policy on its website, the brand’s co-founder Henrietta shared in an interview that the brand’s focus is on creating investment pieces that will last a long time as inspired by what consumers today are looking for.

This year, the brand also released an environmentally conscious swimwear line. The collection consists of 16 pieces made with 100% recycled materials, particularly Q-Nova, which is a nylon fibre obtained from regenerated raw materials.

It is worth noting though that the other collections from the brand are not labelled sustainable. 

Meanwhile, it does claim that it tries to reduce its carbon footprint by ensuring that the production of its garments happens in one place. ‘The final garment is produced in the same region where the fabrics and components are sourced,’ it says.

The brand releases a collection each month, which may not be as frequent as fast-fashion brands do but still a bit more so than designers usually put out.

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Is Rixo ethical?

Rixo prides itself on being a brand that is ‘always inclusive, always empowering.’ 

While the brand doesn’t have a published ethical policy on its website, it says that its suppliers — which are mostly from India and China, and one from Italy — are ‘like family’ and that their work with them is ‘about collaboration.’

Rixo also says that the brand pays ‘fair wages’ to the workers in their suppliers’ factories and that it ensures each one enjoys a safe working condition. 

Rixo’s Animal Welfare Policy

Rixo also doesn’t have a published animal welfare policy. It works with a family-owned factory in Manesar, India for its leather products but doesn’t share how the material is sourced and handled.

Wear Next Opinion

Wear Next believes it’s important to highlight the negative and unjust practises taking place in the fashion industry. We believe ethics and sustainability are an important talking point to bring about change and we encourage you to contact fashion brands to demand this.

However we understand that sustainable fashion isn’t accessible for every body due to various factors, such as budget and the ability to find confidence-boosting clothes that fit. We will continue to offer you fashion inspiration and guidance to suit every body and budget, while also highlighting the unjust systems at play in the fashion industry.